shoestring machine gun

Dear Mr. Blakely:

This refers to your letter of February 6, 2004, to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Firearms Technology Branch (FTB), in which you inquired about the legality of a small section of string intended for use as a means for increasing the cycling rate of a semiautomatie rife.

As you may be aware, the National Firearms Act, 26 U.S.C. 5845(b), defines “machinegun” to include the following:

..any weapon that shoots, is designed to shoot, or can be readily restored to shoot, automatically more than one shot, without manual reloading, by a single function of the trigger. This term shall also include the frame or receiver of any such weapon, any part designed and intended solely and exclusively, or
combination of parts designed and intended, for use in converting a weapon into a machinegan, and any combination of parts from which a machinegun can be assembled if such parts are in the possession or under the control of a person [bolding added].

In 1996, FTB examined and classified a 14 inch long shoestring with a loop at each end. The string was attached to the cocking handle of a semiautomatic rifle and was looped around the trigger and attached to the shooter’s finger. The device caused the weapon to fire repeatedly until finger pressure was released from the string. Because this item was designed and intended to convert a semiautomatic rifle into a machinegun, FTB determined that it was a machinegun as defined in 26 U.S C. 5845(b).

We thank you for your inquiry, regret the delay in response, and trust the foregoing has been responsive.

Sincerely yours,
Sterling Nixon

Chief, Firearms Technology Branch

#shoestring #machine #gun

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  1. Dear Mr. Blakely:

    This refers to your letter of February 6, 2004, to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF,) Firearms Technology Branch (FTB,) in which you inquired about the legality of a small section of string intended for use as a means for increasing the cycling rate of a semiautomatie rife.

    As you may be aware, the National Firearms Act, 26 U.S.C 5845(b,) defines machinegun to include the following:

    .any weapon that shoots, is designed to shoot, or can be readily restored to shoot, automatically more than one shot, without manual reloading, by a single function of the trigger. This term shall also include the frame or receiver of any such weapon, any part designed and intended solely and exclusively, or
    combination of parts designed and intended, for use in converting a weapon into a machinegan, and any combination of parts from which a machinegun can be assembled if such parts are in the possession or under the control of a person [bolding added.]

    In 1996, FTB examined and classified a 14 inch long shoestring with a loop at each end. The string was attached to the cocking handle of a semiautomatic rifle and was looped around the trigger and attached to the shooter’s finger. The device caused the weapon to fire repeatedly until finger pressure was released from the string. Because this item was designed and intended to convert a semiautomatic rifle into a machinegun, FTB determined that it was a machinegun as defined in 26 U.S C. 5845(b.)

    We thank you for your inquiry, regret the delay in response, and trust the foregoing has been responsive.

    Sincerely yours,
    Sterling Nixon
    Chief, Firearms Technology Branch

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