Emiliano and Harriet Mundrucu, Two Early Pioneers of Civil-Rights Litigation, Were Famous in the 1830s but Have Been Almost Entirely Forgotten by History

Emiliano and Harriet Mundrucu, Two Early Pioneers of Civil-Rights Litigation, Were Famous in the 1830s but Have Been Almost Entirely Forgotten by History

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  1. (I previously tried posting this article to r/TodayILearned but I think they removed it—maybe it will find a better reception here. After reading the article but before posting, I searched Reddit, thinking that “surely this has been discussed somewhere on the site before,” but surprisingly I did not find a single result.)

    I went to law school but am no expert in civil lawsuits; however, the last few paragraphs of the court report/opinion (I’m not really sure what I’m looking at) suggest:

    1. The judge limited the case to narrow breach of contract issues, which would allow compensation only for the cost of hotel rooms and alternate transportation—but the jury (interestingly) seems like it was looking for some basis to go further and award more money for costs and attorneys’ fees?

    2. The judge noted that Mundrucu could file a separate lawsuit for “the injury done to his feelings.” I’m no tort expert either, but back then, I bet that would have been an eyebrow-raising statement. Courts were definitely not inclined to to hear lawsuits about feelings.

    Again, just my hot take based only on the BBC article—I hope others find this interesting and a topic for further reading.

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