If leaving without telling anyone is the “Irish Goodbye”, what is the equivalent in other countries?

If leaving without telling anyone is the “Irish Goodbye”, what is the equivalent in other countries?

What do you think?

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  1. The English equivalent is slapping your knee as you get to your feet & saying “Right” loudly, as if to say you’ve been here longer than you’d originally planned & you’re definitely leaving now.

  2. My wife is Indian and when around other Indian people, when it’s time to leave, she goes round every person, chats, hugs, talks about how nice it’s been and makes plans to see them. I’m lucky if I get out the door within an hour of deciding it’s time to leave. I envy the Irish.

  3. The British version is saying you’re going to leave, but keep delaying leaving because you know you shouldn’t actually leave before eventually jumping out a window and breaking your legs.

  4. Latino goodbye: tell someone that you are leaving, gather your items, continue your conversation. Oh, it been 30 minutes, head outside to the car and place the stuff in the car. Oh, an hour has passed, get into the car and start the engine. Oh, 30 minutes has pass and the kids are asleep. Head off, upset that you ruined the conversation.

  5. The Italian-American good bye takes a minimum of 1/2 hour, is loud AF, you’re followed to car and somehow you have a bag full of left-overs in your hand when you get there.

  6. The german goodbye must be making other people leave by making the worst jokes to ever to made in the history of the entire human species itself

  7. I coined the term “Japanese goodbye” meaning “say goodbye to one person, probably the person you like best, and put the burden on them to let everyone know you’ve left.” Lol

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