If there is a dead body in a pool, nobody would swim in it. Most people would or do swim in oceans etc even tho we know there are dead bodies in it. Where is the acceptable ratio of dead bodies to water?

If there is a dead body in a pool, nobody would swim in it. Most people would or do swim in oceans etc even tho we know there are dead bodies in it. Where is the acceptable ratio of dead bodies to water?

What do you think?

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  1. I think my problem would be “Known” dead bodies. Also how recently the body was found. The ocean is so expansive that dead bodies don’t bother me, as long as it wasn’t in the area I was planning on swimming at, but I don’t think I would swim in a lake where a dead body had been found recently. A body found in 1974 is different but in the last 2 years? Fuck that. It also matters how the body was found. Drowned and recovered within an hour, no problem. It’s the decomposition that freaks Me out.

  2. The acceptable ratio for me is all the water in the ocean away now that’s not very helpful so I thought I would measure my acceptable ratio in drops to be more precise.

    Liters of water in the ocean: 1,400,000,000,000,000,000,000.
    How much does one liter of water weigh: the average weight of one liter is around 1 kilogram
    How much does a drop of water weigh: it weighs around 0.05 grams meaning that there are around 19 drops of water per gram of water
    How many drops of water are in 1 kilogram of water: for this answer we times 19 by 1000 = 19000 drops of water per kilogram so that means that 19000 times 1,400,000,000,000,000,000,000 is our answer
    Our answer is 2.66e+25 which i don’t know what that means but i will find out

    So i found out: it is roughly 26 600 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 drops of water

  3. Not a ratio, it’s just the fact that it’s the ocean that changes things.

    There are sharks to kill you

    Jellyfish to sting you

    Crabs. Dead animals. Urine. Shit. Unexploded shells from bombs and lost nukes. People still swim in it.

  4. Moving water naturally cleans itself. A pump with chemicals can do wonders in a small area that’s manmade, but mother nature cleans her waterways out a lot better than we can ours.

  5. I’m not opposed to swimming in a pool w a dead body. Lots of variables. How big is the pool? What kind of body? How long dead? Who else is there?

  6. The ocean is huge. The dead bodies are minuscule in comparison. On top of that the dead bodies don’t last long either due to animals having lunch or due to rapid decomposition. You also aren’t likely to see a body in the ocean for a number of reasons. Basically the ocean is self cleaning.

    Meanwhile a pool is small and a body in it is not that small. It’s also visible and a pool is not self cleaning.

  7. People still swim in oceans regardless of the amounts dead creatures, man eating creatures, poisonous creatures, industrial waste, plastics, munitions and shit of all kinds. You can’t see any of that but it will now be in the back of your minds.

  8. I’d argue the equation is thus: ((Number of bodies x area of average swimming pool) divided by (Area of lake or body of water in question divided by average area of a swimming pool) = number of months till public finds palletable.

    Example: 108 Mile lake had 58 bodies hidden in it between 1875 and 1885 due to the activities of serial killer Agnus McVee. If we figure the average olympic swiming pool is 1250 M2, the “contamination” would be 72500 units.

    108 mile lake is 143.3 ha in size, calulating to about 1,493,000 m2. This leads to a value of 1194.4 units, meaning that the general public for the most part would have forgotten in 60 7/10 months.

    Though, at this point this is most likely all cough medicine and conjecture. :p

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