Is it cultural appropriation for black rappers who grew up in rich neighborhoods to rap about drugs and a having a hard life etc?

Is it cultural appropriation for black rappers who grew up in rich neighborhoods to rap about drugs and a having a hard life etc?

What do you think?

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  1. Yeah, since race obscures the real source of ghetto culture: poverty

    Poverty always breeds the type of culture prevalent in todays rap/hip-hop. It just so happens that black people are overrepresented among the poor in the US due to history.
    If slavery had never happened, and black people were never brought to America en masse there would be some other characteristic people would have a hangup on, that they would consider to be linked with “the ghetto”.
    In Sweden, where I live, it used to be the dialect you spoke and your surname. Immigration from non-white countries and the massive cultural influemce of the US has changed that now, though. These days it’s the language you speak, any accents/dialects, clothing and race.

  2. Makes about as much sense as white country singers from affluent families singing about trailer park and farm life. They don’t understand it, either, but exploiting this chord in the listeners that have, and the people that romanticize the life they haven’t lead, makes them money.

  3. I think the answer is a possible yes. If the rapper is posing as if the experiences they’re rapping about are their own, then yeah. If they’re just telling stories that their audience can relate to, then the line is more blurry. From the outset of hip hop culture there have been terms for people that do this, violators, poseurs, pretend rappers, etc.

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