Similar to Murphy’s Law – is there a name for “diagnostics law”? Where, under observation the problem you want to occur for troubleshooting will not happen. But immediately after all relevant knowledge is absent, it will happen again?

Similar to Murphy’s Law – is there a name for “diagnostics law”? Where, under observation the problem you want to occur for troubleshooting will not happen. But immediately after all relevant knowledge is absent, it will happen again?

What do you think?

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  1. “Mechanic’s Law” or similar, is what I’ve always heard.

    Because when you take your car to the mechanic, it never makes the sound you want him to fix.

    And happy cake day.

  2. Where I work it’s Greg’s Law because when Greg from IT arrives what he was assigned to fix barely gets repaired and something else fails within a day. Greg has held his job for over 20 years. I wish I could be Greg.

  3. I had the problem where I try troubleshooting to the point of having to ask my manager to come have a look at it, and as soon as he steps into the room it starts working again.

  4. I have heard of computer programs having Heisenbugs. Bug behaves differently under observation. Collapse its wave function and no bug. Heisenberg Uncertainty Theorem for computers.

  5. There is a phenomenon called: No Fault Found (NFF) sometimes called ReTest OK (RTOK) or Could Not Duplicate (CND). A fault is logged during operation which the maintener is unable to reproduce during testing in the workshop. The US Air Force introduced a “Bad Actor” policy with”3 strikes”. The 1st time a “faulty” item was NFF, the maintainer classified it serviceable and returned it into circulation. The 2nd time the (same) item was NFF, it was deep checked by a senior/supervisor with more experience. If they still couldn’t duplicate the fault it was returned again into circulation. The 3rd time, the “faulty” item was just scrapped if the fault could not be identified. In Civil Aerospace, many OEMs have a similar but more stringent “2 stikes” policy before scrapping “faulty” items. This might seem economic folly but the real cost of lost operations (delays, cancellations, etc) is usually much greater than the cost of just procuring a new part. In the end, it comes down to improving your testing capabilities.

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