Stephen Jay Gould once said “I am, somehow, less interested in the weight and convolutions of Einstein’s brain than in the near certainty that people of equal talent have lived and died in cotton fields and sweatshops” What unsung historical figure or event reminds you of this?

Stephen Jay Gould once said “I am, somehow, less interested in the weight and convolutions of Einstein’s brain than in the near certainty that people of equal talent have lived and died in cotton fields and sweatshops” What unsung historical figure or event reminds you of this?

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  1. Spartan Helots. Everyone seems to be convinced the Spartans are alpha chad super warriors or some shit they treated women with respect but in truth they were a massive slave state, no different from most empires.

    About 90% of the population were helots that were pruned and raped for laughs, 90% of Spartan women were helots whom free Spartan women would fuck around with for laughs. Same with men. Spartans generally seemed to hate people who worked so naturally they force helots to work farms and textile mills whole simultaneously shaming them for it. I understand the idea but that’s like saying you hate child abuse and beating up abused kids.

    Spartan War records don’t talk about the amount of helot slaves they had as infantry, cannon fodder basically. Like that last stand in 300, there were probably thousands of helots Leonidis forced to fight and die with him. And they were all probably gut up like fish before the Persians put their hands on any of the Spartans.

    You get the idea

  2. [Srinivasa Ramanujan](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Srinivasa_Ramanujan)

    Born in British controlled India in 1887, he had 3 younger siblings who died before their first birthday and contracted smallpox when he was 2.

    At age 11 he started schooling and at age 12 surpassed his teachers in mathematics. He then just studied from a few mathematics books and a book of theorems. During this time he nearly starved to death as well, his family was that poor.

    When he died at the age of 32 he had solved more than 3,900 results and his notebooks are still being studied. He was compared to Euler in the breadth of the breakthroughs he discovered.

  3. Totally anecdotally, I’ve spoken to a number of highly qualified and experienced people who emigrated to Australia or came as refugees, and their qualifications aren’t recognised here. They didn’t have the money to complete whatever certification program they needed to do in order to qualify to work as a doctor or engineer or architect here, so they work as taxi drivers or cleaners to make ends meet.

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